Thursday, September 21, 2017

President outlines steps for green future

President U Htin Kyaw set out the government’s vision for the country’s transition to a green economy yesterday in an opening address to the 5th Green Economy Green Growth Forum, held in Nay Pyi Taw.

President U Htin Kyaw delivers an opening address at the 5th Green Economy Green Growth Forum in Nay Pyi Taw yesterday. Photo: Swan Ye Htut / The Myanmar TimesPresident U Htin Kyaw delivers an opening address at the 5th Green Economy Green Growth Forum in Nay Pyi Taw yesterday. Photo: Swan Ye Htut / The Myanmar Times

Six broad measures – including promoting the renewable energy sector, changing the public’s consumption habits and developing financial incentives for environmentally friendly innovation – make up the government’s overarching plan for a greener future.

“While we are transitioning to a green economy, it will be very important to ensure that the sustainability of natural resources, environmental conservation and environmental management are taken into account when implementing national plans for economic development,” U Htin Kyaw said.

A variety of environmental policies and frameworks to support the government’s green economy goals are currently in development, in collaboration with international organisations, the president added.

Reduction of carbon emissions and a shift to clean energy were highlighted by the president as major priorities for policy development and strategic commitments, given the global focus on these issues.

More than 50 national and international experts attended the forum, which was intended to encourage businesses, experts and the public to collaborate on the country’s future environmental policies.

“The results of this forum will contribute ideas to national development projects,” said Minister for Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation U Ohn Win. “It will help to achieve the sustainable development goal of making our country a ‘green economy’. The framework will benefit and support sustainability in Myanmar’s changing economy for the good of existing and future generations.”

The country’s stake in one of the planet’s most pressing concerns, global warming, is greater than most others: Last year, the advocacy group Germanwatch’s “Global Climate Risk Index 2016” found that from 1995 to 2014, Myanmar was one of three nations most affected by extreme weather events, which are often linked to climate change.


Translation by Zaw Nyunt